Freemasons war dead remembered nearly 100 years on

As part of the Warrington Museum of Freemasonry celebrations for the tercentenary of the Grand Lodge of England (1717-2017), our thoughts have turned to the Freemasons in Warrington who lost their lives during the First World War (1914-1918).

The crosses made by Vic Charlesworth.

The crosses made by Vic Charlesworth.

It is chilling to think that the British Army had some 8,700,000 men available for deployment, of which 2,270,000 were wounded or died of disease and some 970,000 were killed in action. These figures also include those missing, presumed dead. Only half of these men have a known marked grave.

Amongst those figures were two Warrington Freemasons, the first being Lance Corporal William Haddock Robinson, a member of Lodge of Friendship No 2963, (interestingly, his father who also had the name William Haddock Robinson, was a member of the Lodge of Lights No 148). The second was Lieutenant Percy Carter who was a member of Gilbert Greenall Lodge No 1250.

To celebrate the lives of these men and recognise their sacrifice, Warrington Museum Archivist Caroline Crook has written an in-depth article, detailing the lives of these two Freemasons, which can be found on the Warrington Museum of Freemasonry website www.museum.westlancsfreemasons.org.uk (under the projects heading).

Commemorative plaque in Warrington Masonic Hall.

Commemorative plaque in Warrington Masonic Hall.

A commemorative plaque was unveiled on the Heritage Open Day in September 2017 by the Mayor of Warrington, Councillor Les Morgan and Andy Barton, Chairman of the Warrington Group. Also, the curator of the museum, Vic Charlesworth handmade two beautiful crosses which were placed on their graves by Rob and Caroline Crook.

Story and pictures by Caroline Crook.

Rob Crook placing the crosses on the graves of William Robinson and Percy Carter.

Rob Crook placing the crosses on the graves of William Robinson and Percy Carter.